Industry News

The National Comfort Institute's (NCI) annual Home and HVAC Performance Summit 2017 is in the final stages of preparation, and HVAC contractors from around the country are invited to attend. The event takes place April 2-4, 2017 at the We-Ko-Pah Conference Center and Resort in Scottsdale, Arizona. [...]
Fri, Feb 24, 2017
ACHR News
By: Jordan Pietrak, Manager, Education, Food Marketing Institute I've learned there's no set equation of traits and qualities that make an outstanding store manager. In single day, these hardworking individuals often wear many hats as they jump from project to project to serve their store and customers. Each store manager hones their own unique skill set that helps their team navigate various opportunities and challenges. Here are some characteristics that make a great store manager: S trategic Thinker T rustworthy O rganized R esults Oriented E ncouraging M entor A mbitious N ice A ttentive G enerous E nergetic R esolute Know a store manager that demonstrates these qualities? Nominate them for FMI's Store Manager Awards by March 6. These awards will be presented at the 2017 Future Leaders eXperience June 11-13 in Chicago, Illinois. Learn more at www.FMI.org/StoreManagerAwards.    [...]
Fri, Feb 24, 2017
FMI News
Locally owned and operated Regan Heating and Air Conditioning, which has been serving Rhode Island and Southeastern New England for nearly 50 years, has joined forces with One Hour Heating & Air Conditioning (One Hour), part of the Direct Energy family of brands. Regan's One Hour will also soon begin offering plumbing services under the Benjamin Franklin Plumbing (Benjamin Franklin) name, another Direct Energy brand. [...]
Fri, Feb 24, 2017
ACHR News
Schneider Electric, an energy management and automation specialist, announced the availability of its Clinical Environment Optimization solution. Delivered as an application for Schneider Electric's StruxureWare™ Building Operation software, the solution integrates hospitals' clinical infrastructure with its facility infrastructure to drive innovation at every level of the organization and deliver new opportunities for energy savings, staff productivity, and patient satisfaction. [...]
Thu, Feb 23, 2017
ACHR News
By: Jennifer Hatcher, Chief Public Policy Officer & Senior Vice President, Government Relations Each year, FMI's Government Relations department surveys its member companies to understand their policy and legislative priorities and how FMI can enhance our voice for food retail in Washington D.C. With a new presidential Administration and a new Congress, it is especially critical to focus on new opportunities and challenges for each of these issues so that we can have a measurable impact on the legislative and regulatory fronts of food retail. Our priority policy issues for 2017 are: Tax Reform Fixes to Affordable Care Act /Health Care Reform Swipe Fee Reform/Preservation of Debit Reforms Labor Policy Menu Labeling Food Safety/FSMA Pension Reform Food Assistance: Protect SNAP and WIC FMI Government Relations is working here in Washington to navigate the political landscape to provide a voice for the food industry and work with Congress, the regulatory agencies, and the FMI membership. Our public policy agenda covers a broad and diverse portfolio of legislative issues to accommodate the variety of business, consumer and workplace circumstances that the grocery industry manages. To keep up on the latest happenings in the nation's capital, sign up for our newsletters for timely issue updates and early warnings. We also want to invite you to join our annual Day in Washington fly-in, May 2-4, 2017, to share your stories with lawmakers on Capitol Hill. [...]
Thu, Feb 23, 2017
FMI News
Miura America Co., a designer and manufacturer of energy-efficient, eco–friendly industrial steam boilers, announced it has secured a $21 million investment to help improve operations and meet increasing demand. The company will close on a partial investment of $1 million this year and will close on the remaining $20 million over the next five years. [...]
Thu, Feb 23, 2017
ACHR News
BirdDogHR™, a talent management solution for the construction, engineering, and skilled trades industries, has been named “Best Applicant Tracking System (ATS)” for mid-market size businesses on G2 Crowd's list of “Best Software for Human Resource (HR) Teams” in 2017. [...]
Wed, Feb 22, 2017
ACHR News
As Congress begins talks on tax reform, lawmakers have discussed the possibility of including a border adjustment tax (BAT) as a potential part of a tax reform package. A BAT is a kind of consumption tax or value added tax that would be imposed on goods imported into the country while exports are exempt. FMI's Andy Harig provided an overview of the border adjustment tax for FMI members to fully understand how such a proposal could affect the industry and the tax burdens of member companies. Click to Access the Members-Only Webinar [...]
Wed, Feb 22, 2017
FMI News
Mowery, a construction company based in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, announced the addition of Jared Rohrbaugh of Dover, Pennsylvania, as a project leader in the special projects group. [...]
Wed, Feb 22, 2017
ACHR News
Mowery, a construction company based in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, announced the addition of Tim Johnson of Waynesboro, Pennsylvania as a project manager. [...]
Tue, Feb 21, 2017
ACHR News
By: Hilary Thesmar, PhD, RD, CFS, Chief Food and Product Safety Officer and Vice President, Food Safety Programs Prevention of Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) in retail delis has been a priority issue of FMI for over a decade and we've published several guidance documents, held numerous meetings and presentations on the topic. As a rare, but very serious bacterial pathogen, Lm grows best in moist, cold environments and has an affinity for protein rich foods. The association of Lm with deli foods and the deli environment has been well documented in the food safety literature. Both FDA and USDA have expressed concern about the public health impact of Lm and have published several risk assessments on Lm over the past few decades. Most notably, the September 2013 Interagency Risk Assessment – Listeria monocytogenes in Retail Delicatessens which prompted several subsequent documents including the “FSIS Best Practice Guidance for Controlling Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) in Retail Delicatessens”. The FSIS guidance document was the basis for a year-long pilot project that began in January 2016 to assess whether retailers were following the recommendations outlined in the June 2015 Best Practice Guidance. The results of the pilot project were published in the January 13, 2017 Constituent Update and are summarized in the table below. As part of the USDA FSIS Strategic Plan FY2017-2012, FSIS has announced plans to extend the pilot project from 2017 until then end of calendar year 2021 to continue evaluating how retailers are controlling Lm and their adoption of the FSIS Retail Lm Guidance recommendations. The FSIS Guidance notes the following eight recommendations as having the greatest impact to protect public health: Eliminate visibly adulterated product present in the retail deli; Refrigerate ready-to-eat (RTE) meat or poultry products promptly after use; Do not prepare, hold, or store RTE meat or poultry products near or directly adjacent to raw products in the deli case or elsewhere in the deli area; Cover, wrap, or otherwise protect all opened RTE meat or poultry products when not in use to prevent cross-contamination; Ensure that insanitary conditions (e.g., flies, rodent droppings, mold, or dirty surfaces) are not present where RTE meat and poultry products are prepared, packed, and held; Clean and sanitize equipment used to process RTE products at least every 4 hours; Eliminate facility conditions in the deli area or storage area that could cause the products to become adulterated (e.g., condensation dripping on exposed product, construction dust, or broken equipment); and Require deli employees handling RTE products to wear disposable gloves. As we learn more from FSIS, FMI will be sharing more information about this pilot project and the agency plans to evaluate the industry. In the meantime, we encourage you to remain vigilant and continue to focus on cleaning, sanitation, temperature control, food storage, food handling, and employee training. FMI has made the following resources available to you to help simplify [...]
Tue, Feb 21, 2017
FMI News
VISCMA is a non-profit association representing the manufacturers of seismic restraint, vibration isolation, and noise control equipment. The primary objectives of the organization are to educate the construction industry on the proper use and application of vibration isolation and seismic restraint and to develop standards to continually improve the industry. [...]
Tue, Feb 21, 2017
ACHR News
Venstar, a thermostat and energy management systems supplier, announced that its ColorTouch color touch screen Wi-Fi thermostat received a 2016 internet of things (IoT) Evolution Connected Home and Building Award from IoT Evolution magazine. This award honors organizations delivering innovative solutions that enable the advancement of the smart home and buildings industry. [...]
Mon, Feb 20, 2017
ACHR News
With the rise in popularity of Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube, some enterprising contractors are employing digital marketing strategies on social media platforms. [...]
Mon, Feb 20, 2017
ACHR News
Today, many homeowners trust the opinions of their contractors, but more often than not, they also do some research of their own online before making decisions about their purchases. [...]
Mon, Feb 20, 2017
ACHR News
Many certifying organizations provide marketing materials for their members to help them brand their companies as true professionals in the HVAC industry. [...]
Mon, Feb 20, 2017
ACHR News
There are dozens of marketing metrics business owners could track. However, which metrics should they focus on? And how, why, and when should these data be considered? [...]
Mon, Feb 20, 2017
ACHR News
Acuity Brands, Inc. announced that its subsidiary, Distech Controls, has signed an agreement with Cochrane Supply & Engineering, an industrial internet of things (IoT) distributor, to expand Distech Controls' sales footprint in Michigan, Kentucky, and parts of Ohio. [...]
Mon, Feb 20, 2017
ACHR News
During the four-day event, HARDI announced the re-launch of one of its four strategic pillars, Education, which will serve as the new Talent pillar and provide a broader scope of services and resources to members as it relates to their employees and workforce development. [...]
Mon, Feb 20, 2017
ACHR News
By: Elissa McLerran, Public Policy Communications Manager Grocers play an important role in the efficient delivery of safe, affordable food for all customers. One vehicle used in this delivery is the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). The U.S. House of Representatives Agriculture Committee held a hearing on the pros and cons of restricting SNAP food choice. FMI's President and CEO Leslie Sarasin served as a witness for the hearing and shared the food retailer perspective on the complexity and importance of SNAP. Much of the conversation focused on the challenges with implementing restrictions and the benefits of incentives and education.    Joining FMI on the panel, witnesses from Brookings Institution, The Food Trust, and Cornell University's Food and Brand Lab discussed the added complexity and costs that restrictions would bring and the lack of data to support that the restriction would improve public health. Sarasin shared current nutrition education efforts that FMI member companies are engaged in, such as having registered dietitians and nutritionists in stores to help customers choose healthy options and National Family Meals Month®, the FMI Foundation's initiative to increase the number of meals eaten by families at home. Sarasin also highlighted the need for sound public policy as changes to the program are considered and implemented. FMI and member companies will continue to be an active and engaged partner in this endeavor of finding the best programmatic solution to achieve the Agriculture Committee's goals. In his closing remarks, Chairman Mike Conaway (R-TX) said that while this is likely not the last conversation on the topic, it is important to recognize that there is no silver bullet to address obesity, but he hopes that all of the SNAP and nutrition discussions will help all of the country make healthier decisions. To view Sarasin's full testimony, click here.   [...]
Fri, Feb 17, 2017
FMI News
By: Leslie G. Sarasin, President and CEO, Food Marketing Institute Playwright George Bernard Shaw is credited with the observation, “The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.”  In an economy of words, Shaw answered the human quandary of why - upon analysis - so very many  difficulties and problems are summarily assessed with some version of the phrase, “there was a 'failure to communicate.'”  Given how easily miscommunication occurs – or said another way, for communication to NOT occur – the lesson is simple for us. If communication matters, we must redouble our efforts to ensure it happens, even when we think we've been clear.   At the January 29 meeting of the Trading Partner Alliance (TPA), this joint group of members of the FMI and GMA executive committees affirmed a recommendation for industry-wide adoption of common product code date labeling language. This recommendation is the result of the year-long labor of a working group comprised of individuals from 25 FMI/GMA member companies, representing every food category and every aspect of food operations, including supply chain, sustainability, brand management/marketing, regulatory, government relations, food safety, consumer affairs, and quality control. The group was charged with finding suitable date label language to help reduce consumer confusion created by the divergent language currently in use, while being as sensitive as possible to consumer preferences, the impact on industry operations and potential pending legislation. Viewed more simply, this proposal demonstrates the industry's redoubling of effort to communicate as clearly as possible with its customers via date labels.  This TPA affirmed recommendation calls for voluntary industry-wide adoption of two sets of product code date labeling language: one for shelf stable items, when the date is for communicating quality issues, and another for certain items when the date language conveys guidance regarding material degradation of product performance or the possibility of food safety concerns.  The focus of this proposal was to reach agreement on the product code date language to be used. However, reaching agreement on the words is not the end of the journey, there is much remaining work to be done regarding: 1) clarification of what falls into the two categories, particularly the latter; 2) determination of the industry posture toward federal legislation to address this issue; and 3) creation of a consumer education campaign to support and amplify the industry's efforts at communicating clearly. The working group will continue to monitor ongoing work in these three work streams. We cannot rest until we are confident we are “communicating,” and doing so clearly. For more resources, visit FMI.org/ProductCodeDating.  [...]
Thu, Feb 16, 2017
FMI News
By: Doug Baker, Vice President Industry Relations-Private Brands, Technology, Food Marketing Institute If ever there was a time to turn up the dial on asset protection, it is now. While there are any number of issues that keep those charged with asset protection up at night, perhaps no topic is more vital to your company's customers and investors than that of food defense. As part of the Audit/Safety/Asset Protection (ASAP) Conference, Rod Wheeler, founder and CEO of the Global Food Defense Institute, will lead a session titled “Risk, Readiness & Reliability: Conducting Your Supply Chain Vulnerability and Risk Assessments.” “Food retailers, like other industries, need to remain vigilant,” said Wheeler. “Companies have to arm themselves to protect their people, their products, their customers and the national economy.” In his fast-paced session at the ASAP Conference, scheduled March 20-22 at Rosen Shingle Creek in Orlando, Wheeler will take attendees through everything we now know about how to protect the supply chain that eventually delivers products to your customers. “Specifically, the food that will end up on your customers' dinner table,” he said. Wheeler will clearly point out the three most important steps you company must take to assure the supply chain that delivers products to your customers is safe. First, he will explain what a site vulnerability assessment is and how you can conduct your own. Next, Wheeler will help you understand how to write a facility food defense plan. Finally, he will explain what you must do to assure that your managers and supervisors are fully trained in food defense. Certainly, there are great risks in assuring the security of your supply chain, but there are also great opportunities as consumers increasingly look with a discriminating eye toward those retailers whose products they can trust. “The goal here is to enlighten attendees on what's out there and what means we have to protect the supply chain,” Wheeler said. Attend this ASAP Conference session and guarantee your T's are crossed and your I's are dotted when it comes to food defense. Learn more at www.FMIASAP.com.   [...]
Wed, Feb 15, 2017
FMI News
By: Jordan Pietrak, Manager, Education, Food Marketing Institute Oftentimes, we compare store managers to master jugglers. At any point in time, they're skillfully balancing the day-to-day duties of their job, while meeting the business objectives and goals of their company. That's why FMI's Store Manager Awards highlight the oft-unheralded dedication store managers make to their communities and, more specifically, the store managers who are innovatively contributing to their company's success as well as the success of the food retail industry.  What does it take for a store manager to win FMI's Store Manager Award? Previous winner, Charlynne Stunder, one of Save on Foods' store managers in Vancouver, BC Canada shares her advice with rising leaders of the food industry. “I think this award is important because it showcases the hard work and talent we have in our industry,” said Stunder. “It gives managers a chance to network and connect with each other across different companies and countries.” After winning the Store Manager Award in 2015, Stunder was promoted to serve as a manager in one of Save On Foods top stores,  Stunder said, “For 15 years it was my goal to one day manage this store, and here I am!” For Charlynne, winning a Store Manager Award was more than a personal accomplishment. “Not only was I personally proud to win this award, but I was more proud that I could win it for my team and my company,” explained Stunder. “It was a truly amazing feeling to see my name and company on the ‘big screen' on stage in Chicago!” Charlynne started in the food industry with her company as a cashier after school.  As the years progressed, Stunder realized she enjoyed working in the fast-paced environment of food retail, and the family atmosphere created by her store's team and long-term customer base. Her commitment and passion as a store manager did not go unnoticed by her colleagues who nominated her for a Store Manager Award. When she received the call that she was a finalist for the Award in 2015 she was speechless.  She encourages the next round of Store Manager Award nominees to embrace the moment and enjoy every second. Stunder recommends, “Meet as many people as you can and build relationships.  We can all learn from each other. Most of all, just have fun!” Know a grocery store manager making a difference like Charlynne Stunder? Surprise them by nominating them for FMI's Store Manager Awards by March 6! Learn more at www.FMI.org/StoreManagerAwards.  [...]
Tue, Feb 14, 2017
FMI News
By: Rob Rosado, Senior Director, Food & Health Policy There has been a flurry of activity in the first month of the Trump administration and the 115th Congress with a corresponding need to figure out how all of these actions and issues affect food retailers. One question to ask: Where does FDA's menu labeling rule and its May 5, 2017 compliance date fit into these discussions? For the past six years, FMI has been seeking common sense flexibility, such as liability protections for good-faith compliance efforts, allowing the use of a central menu board for a salad bar, and preserving locally-made and locally-sourced foods. But FDA has either been unwilling or unable to include these compliance modifications in their rule or guidance. As a result, FMI has been pursuing adoption of the Common Sense Nutrition Disclosure Act (H.R. 772/S. 261), which provides the needed flexibility that FMI has been seeking to allow supermarkets to provide the same nutrition information to customers as required under the menu labeling statute, but in a less costly, more efficient way. While the bill would not exempt supermarkets or other retailers from the menu labeling requirements, it would provide more adequate time and flexibility to protect retailers from overzealous inspectors and hostile lawsuits. The identical bill was passed by a 266-144 bipartisan vote in the House last year, and we are hopeful that the bill will have additional urgency and momentum to be enacted.   In the interim, FMI is seeking for the Trump administration to follow through on the groundwork laid by White House directives covering Regulatory Freeze Pending Review, Reducing Regulations and Controlling Costs, and an Executive Order Minimizing Economic Burden of the Affordable Care Act, under all of which the menu labeling rule qualifies, to formally withhold the menu labeling rule prior to the May 2017 compliance date for comment regarding food retailers' uncertainty and to allow for needed modifications. We urge FMI members to continue with their implementation plans for May 5, 2017 as we seek these executive and legislative actions.  Please see the FMI draft implementation guide on FMI's website that is still undergoing FDA review, and be sure to let us and your members of Congress know what problems you are facing. [...]
Mon, Feb 13, 2017
FMI News
Last week, Cynthia Brazzel, director of member relations and advocacy for the western region at FMI, joined Cherie Phipps, director of the Retail Management Certificate Program at Western Association of Food Chains (WAFC), to promote the Retail Management Certificate Program (RMCP) at Albertsons' Southern Division Offices in Fort Worth, Texas. Albertsons is helping its employees further their food retail skills by providing information and tuition assistance for the Certificate Program. FMI partners with WAFC to provide rising food retailers with the necessities to become successful managers and leaders in the food industry. Learn more about the Retail Management Certificate Program at, www.retailmanagementcertificate.com. [...]
Fri, Feb 10, 2017
FMI News
By: Doug Baker, Vice President Industry Relations-Private Brands, Technology, Food Marketing Institute Throughout his four+ years directing Google's global corporate meals program, Michiel Bakker, director of global food services, noted that “food at work really works” – in terms of building culture, happiness and supporting health and wellness among its employees. Mr. Bakker explained during his Midwinter Executive Conference presentation that the 165,000 meals served per day to 110,000 individuals is certainly an investment in the company's overall mission to incubate creativity and feed talent. The Google Food program has implications for food retailers' own employees and it also offers insights into new merchandising and sustainable partnership opportunities. In fact, this program is a microcosm of what retailers are trying to do with their health and wellness initiatives. Unfortunately, they can't offer the food for free. Mr. Bakker said that many employees eat better at work than they do at home because the program enables individuals to make personal, informed food choices for sustainable lifestyle, but Google also caters to a time-deprived and younger generation that doesn't always have the right skills to make the food at home. The same kitchens that feed Google employees support staff in building culinary skill sets by offering basic cooking classes and even team building events. He asserted that better-for-you foods should be easiest to access when you offer free food. However, he cautioned not to take away treats, but to instead make the alternative better, more attractive, easier and convenient. Citing Google's user insights for its feeding program, he noted several trends impacting Google Food's design: the growing eating (not cooking) culture; the idea that we're all experts when it comes to food; the desire to create digital food experiences; personalization; grazing, instead of three-squares –a-day; the constant struggle of what we say versus what we actually do; and how people are making tradeoffs. The program is branded Google, but executed by vendor partners and franchisees. Mr. Bakker and his team define expectations and the vendor program brings it to life. Globally, there's an expectation for a similar approach and experience among all the Google offices. Essentially, he's managing globally branded franchises that offer sustainable solutions to corporate feeding and nutrition programs. Mr. Bakker offered several action items for the food retail audience at our conference when implementing their own food-at-work program: Investment or cost: How could you afford not to invest? Provide support to users Food care and health care are intertwined Flavor rules Make the alternative food choice taste better, more attractive, easier, convenient Culinarians are key, so do not underestimate the chef Act. Launch. Google is a monumental Bay Area company synonymous as an incubator for ideas and culture, but in this intimate executive roundtable session, I found them to be a company that inherently cares about its people, nourishing them, creating community and being good stewards of resources. Google and food [...]
Fri, Feb 10, 2017
FMI News
Hilary Thesmar, PhD, RD, Chief Food and Product Safety Officer and Vice President, Food Safety Programs In late January, food safety professionals from FMI retail and wholesale member companies gathered in Scottsdale, AZ to discuss the 2017 food safety initiatives. The discussion is part of a systematic process that the FMI Food Protection Committee (FPC) goes through each year to determine its annual priorities. The priority initiatives typically mirror the top issues that the industry is facing in food safety and will be the focus of the committee's time and resources to develop programs and materials that will make a measurable impact in retail food safety.     The 2017 Priority Initiatives are: Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Implementation and Compliance Menu Labeling and Enforcement Recalls Listeria Prevention at Retail Cleaning and Sanitation Practices  These initiatives represent some of the largest regulatory implementation challenges that retailers and wholesalers have seen in decades. Food safety professionals are implementing multiple FSMA regulations as well as implementing menu labeling regulations in retail stores. This level of federal regulatory oversight is unprecedented and the implementation challenges are impacting many departments within retail organizations. The FMI Food Protection Committee plans to develop tools to assist with compliance and will form workgroups to address specific areas of concern.   Recalls, Listeria prevention at retail, and cleaning and sanitation practices are ongoing food safety issues for retailers. The FMI Food Protection Committee plans to address these issues by collaborating with other organizations, associations, regulatory agencies, and subject matter experts in order to make advances in science and technology, develop innovative food safety solutions and increase adoption of best practices. The FMI Food Safety Committee and the FMI Board of Directors has reviewed and approved the 2017 initiatives. The Food Protection Committee (FPC) is committed to food safety and enhancing the industry understanding of food safety issues. The FPC is already busy working on the initiatives and they are hopeful that their work will make a measurable difference in the year to come. The work of the Food Protection Committee (FPC) is available for all retailers and wholesalers to utilize to improve their food safety programs. To see the resources developed by the FPC as a result of initiatives from prior years, visit the FMI Food Safety Resource Page.   [...]
Thu, Feb 09, 2017
FMI News
By: Carol Abel, Vice President of Education, Food Marketing Institute Some recent stories in the media have hypothesized that the grocery checkout clerk and deli associate will be replaced by robots and other emerging technologies. For those working in the food retail industry this might raise some alarms, but if we stop and examine the issue a bit further we'll see the story isn't as black and white as it may seem. Here are some grey areas to consider: Convenience vs. Human Interaction - First, I would remind readers that the grocery business is an industry founded on customer service. According to The Food Retailing Industry Speaks 2016 (Speaks) report, excellence in customer service is directly linked to trip satisfaction and higher trip spending, which is in part why 95 percent of food retailers report customer service as a strategy for differentiating themselves in the marketplace. As I was reminded by Steve Pinder, partner at Kurt Salmon Associates, during our recent Midwinter Executive Conference, when it comes down to it, “Customers want to buy something they desire from someone they trust.” While advancing technologies may offer a convenience factor, until the level of customer service machines provide exceeds that of human interaction or even empathy, food retail talent will remain brand differentiators. Experience vs. Delivery – We also have to keep in mind that as technologies advance, the desire for experiences increases. Take for example a recent interaction with my millennial daughter. She asked me if we could go to the grocery store for our weekly food shopping. When I asked her why she would rather go to the store than just order items online she pointedly explained, “It's all about the experience, Mom.” Experiences come with attention to the individual's needs and comforts, which can only be assessed by human to human contact. Would your weekly grocery shopping be as enjoyable if you didn't talk to the butcher about the meat specials or exchange pleasantries with the bagger? As the grocery industry faces technologies that simplify shopping, it will be even more important to maintain and enhance the pageantry and theater of food shopping. Jobs of Today vs. Jobs of Tomorrow – Already careers in food retail require far more knowledge and skill with technology than ever before. Perhaps it's not that the food retail jobs of today will be replaced, but more that food retail workers will need to add new skills as emerging technologies become commonplace. This is one reason FMI will host Future Leaders, June 11 – 13, 2017, in Chicago, where our industry's leaders of tomorrow will undergo an experience that gives each and every one of them a new idea of what will be required of industry leaders in the 21st century. FMI is committed to helping the food retail industry navigate the rapid changes facing our industry. Part of this effort is a joint initiative with Nielsen exploring the digital food shopper and how to adapt to meet customers' changing needs. In fact, you can take a brief [...]
Wed, Feb 08, 2017
FMI News
By: Peter Collins, Director of Industry Relations and Development, Food Marketing Institute  Progressive Grocer recently reported about new research released during the FMI 2017 Midwinter Executive Conference that outlines the opportunity for grocery stores to increase sales by reconsidering their store's General Merchandise (GM) and Health and Beauty Care (HBC) categories. The report, conducted by Acosta Strategic Advisors, points out shoppers are in grocery stores four times more than other outlets, representing an opportunity to capture not only their food shopping needs, but also their GM/HBC essentials. The report also includes key marketing and merchandising strategies for growing GM/HBC sales at food retail. Get an overview of the findings by watching the below video and download the report at www.fmi.org/GMHBC. [...]
Tue, Feb 07, 2017
FMI News
By: Daniel Triot, Senior Director, FMI-GMA Trading Partner Alliance In 2016, a number of regulations went into effect that will affect the food retail industry, including the beginning of the implementation of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). The compliance date for one of the major FSMA rules passed in September and the industry is continuing to move forward with additional food safety efforts as compliance begins for many of the other key FSMA rules later this year. FSMA will have an impact on every aspect of the food supply chain from farm through retail to ensure that we keep the nation's food supply safe. Food retailers cannot ignore the rising pressure to keep track of these new rules and regulations that are constantly being rolled out and implemented. At the 2017 Supply Chain Conference, there will be several sessions discussing a number of regulations facing the food industry, including labor laws, product recalls and more: FSMA has specific rules for food imports and the importer of record to secure the food supply chain. Learn more about Working through the Intricacies of FSMA's Importer and Foreign Verification Rules for Food Imports.   With thousands of pages of regulations, compliance with all of the FSMA rules can be challenging and taxing for the entire supply chain. Attend FSMA Implementation – What Do I Need to Know and What Do I Need to Do? to learn what you need to know and do to implement FSMA for your company.   When it comes to hazardous waste, regulatory rules and reporting requirements are highly scrutinized and fines for noncompliance could cost your company millions. The Regulatory Environment: Making Sense of it All session will address the challenges and solutions available for managing hazardous items throughout the supply chain.   It's difficult for businesses to navigate a recall when multiple regulatory bodies are involved. Hazards of a Recall: Cracking the Code when Multiple Regulatory Bodies are Involved session will offer actionable insight to overcome some of the toughest challenges you face when it comes to recalls. Learn how you can transform your supply chain by attending the 2017 Supply Chain Conference in San Diego, California, April 30 – May 2, 2017. Don't wait, register today! [...]
Mon, Feb 06, 2017
FMI News