Industry News

TV spots are retailer’s first focusing on employees [...]
Wed, Jun 26, 2019
Supermarket News
West Coast grocer rolls out date check system to all stores [...]
Wed, Jun 26, 2019
Supermarket News
Ahold Delhaize USA chain bolsters stores in key growth market [...]
Wed, Jun 26, 2019
Supermarket News
Seeds, jerky, next-gen tea and more were on display [...]
Wed, Jun 26, 2019
Supermarket News
Innovation lab will house H-E-B Digital, Favor team members [...]
Wed, Jun 26, 2019
Supermarket News
By: Leslie G. Sarasin, President and CEO, Food Marketing Institute Yesterday was an historic moment for food retail business owners large and small. Just how often does a person or organization have the chance to influence history? The Food Marketing Institute on behalf of the food retail industry did just that by achieving a landmark U.S. Supreme Court victory (6-3) in its fight to protect retailer and shopper privacy.  As FMI's counsel stated soon after the Court issued its opinion, "This case reversed decades of circuit opinions, which doesn't happen often. FMI is now a part of history." The Court's opinion affirmed that FOIA was created to shine a light on the government, not on private parties, and the Supreme Court's holding creates an important precedent that could extend well beyond store-level Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) sales data in grocery, which was the subject of the case before the Court.  The nation's grocery stores have long kept confidential the amount consumers spend at individual stores with cash, credit or SNAP. To preserve the trust established over the years between grocers and their customers and communities, FMI asked the United States Supreme Court to apply the Freedom of Information Act's (FOIA) plain language, which simply asks whether retailers keep their sales data confidential, not why they do so. Store-level sales data is undoubtedly confidential, and the Supreme Court agreed the word “confidential” in FOIA Exemption 4 must be interpreted according to its plain text. FMI's counsel at Baker Botts offers further analysis of the Court's opinion below:  “On June 24, 2019, the Supreme Court agreed with FMI: store-level SNAP redemption data can be protected because retailers keep it confidential, and because retailers participated in SNAP with the government's assurances that such data would remain confidential.   Justice Neil Gorsuch wrote the opinion for a six-member majority of the Supreme Court. The opinion began by noting that when USDA chose not to appeal, FMI “answered the call.” The court then rejected the “substantial competitive harm” test as having no basis in the plain text of Exemption 4. The court called the test “a relic from a ‘bygone era of statutory construction.'”   Instead, the court held that commercial information is “confidential” when it is customarily kept private, pursuant to the ordinary meaning of “confidential.” The court then concluded that “there's no question” that SNAP data is kept confidential by retailers. The court also rejected the newspaper's policy arguments as inadequate to overcome the statutory text.  Justice Stephen Breyer, joined by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Justice Sonia Sotomayor, wrote a separate opinion concurring in part and dissenting in part. While Justice Breyer agreed that the “substantial competitive harm” test should not be the law, he would have required some proof of harm for information to be considered “confidential” and thus exempt from mandatory disclosure.   The Supreme Court's decision not only protects the 2005 to 2010 SNAP data, but will likely serve as a bulwark against future requests for retailers' SNAP data. The decision may also help limit disclosure of other types of private commercial information that has been submitted to the government.” The case is Food Marketing Institute v. Argus Leader Media, No. 18-481, before the Supreme Court of the United States. For more information, visit FMI.org/SCOTUS.  Your perseverance in this case is to be commended and your support of FMI's efforts is greatly appreciated. [...]
Wed, Jun 26, 2019
FMI News
During grilling season, retailers need to promote a range of traditional and value-added products [...]
Tue, Jun 25, 2019
Supermarket News
Learn how Mediterranean cheeses like DODONI feed the new generation’s ethnically diverse palate [...]
Tue, Jun 25, 2019
Supermarket News
Online shopping event scheduled for July 15-16 [...]
Tue, Jun 25, 2019
Supermarket News
Discount retailer's mission includes providing affordable 'natural, organic, specialty and healthy' foods [...]
Tue, Jun 25, 2019
Supermarket News
Retailers seek to boost traffic in the pet aisle and combat online sales [...]
Tue, Jun 25, 2019
Supermarket News
Warehouse club also goes chainwide with Instacart [...]
Tue, Jun 25, 2019
Supermarket News
Decision reinforces confidentiality of store-level information, institute says [...]
Mon, Jun 24, 2019
Supermarket News
Delivery heads to the beach—and to parks and office lobbies [...]
Mon, Jun 24, 2019
Supermarket News
Airline says online retailer infringes on its name [...]
Mon, Jun 24, 2019
Supermarket News
In-store kiosk serves a one-stop shop for ingredients [...]
Mon, Jun 24, 2019
Supermarket News
By: Melaina Lewis, Manager, Communications, Food Marketing Institute The Community Outreach Awards have become one of the most anticipated and fun annual recognitions at FMI. Each year, I find my colleagues and I are inspired by food retailers' innovative acts of kindness, so much so, that we find ourselves sharing these stories among our friends and families. Here are a few reasons why FMI staff appreciate the Community Outreach Awards.  “Grocery stores don't toot their own horn enough. If I didn't work at FMI, I wouldn't know the good grocers do.”– Sue Wilkinson, senior director, research and information service “Our members are pillars of the community and it really shines when a crisis happens. I love knowing that our members are there in times of need when disaster strikes.”– Bianca Ruffin, senior manager, marketing “It's inspiring to see the good our grocers are doing.”– Sarah Malenich, director, marketing & sales, Safe Quality Food Institute “Every morning on my drive to work I hear a radio segment called “Tell Me Something Good.” FMI's Community Outreach Awards are just like this segment—it's a chance to hear about the good things going on in our industry. Yes, our industry is changing, but it's rewarding to know that at its heart, food retailers are about people helping people.”– Kelli Windsor, director, digital communications  The FMI Community Outreach Awards showcases the stories we don't hear often enough—the ones that focus on how grocers give back to their communities and are maintaining the food retail tradition of serving their neighbors. We've extended the deadline to submit a Grocers Doing Good story to Thursday, June 27 at 5 p.m. EST.  For more information, visit FMI.org/CommunityOutreach   [...]
Mon, Jun 24, 2019
FMI News
By: Allison Febrey, Assistant, Health & Wellness/FMI Foundation/Food & Product Safety, Food Marketing Institute For National Family Meals Month™ (NFMM) 2018, Gold Plate Award-winner Wakefern Food Corp. encouraged family meals throughout their entire company. I reached out to Natalie Menza-Crowe, director of health and wellness at Wakefern Food Corp., to learn about their NFMM program. Why did you decide to make this campaign bigger and better than anything you had done before? Natalie Menza-Crowe (NMC): ShopRite has always been a big supporter of FMI Foundation's National Family Meals Month™ campaign, and last year we decided that we wanted to expand our 2018 program to make it our most comprehensive and impactful ever. NFMM has always been a campaign spearheaded by ShopRite's Health and Wellness department, but last year we worked with our executive leadership to create a campaign that would leverage the synergies of our entire company --including procurement, advertising, philanthropy, corporate and retail communications, to name just a few divisions -- in order to communicate the importance and value of sharing more family meals together to our customers and associates. What kind of feedback did you receive from staff? NMC: At an executive level, our team was vested in the campaign from the very beginning, and that enthusiasm trickled down throughout our company and helped make our NFMM program come to life on so many levels. The messaging of NFMM is well aligned with the core values and overarching purpose of our company, which is to help people to eat well and be happy. I'm proud to say that last year's campaign really lived out our purpose, and having the full support and encouragement of our leadership team, our independent owners and operators, and our associates, really made a difference in how seamlessly we executed this Gold Plate Award-winning campaign. How did you involve your entire company in family meals? NMC: To be honest, it was easy to involve the whole company because the message of this campaign resonates with just about everyone. Our associates are also our customers, and everyone is always looking to discover ways to eat more meals at home, share more meals with their family, and find dinner solutions that are delicious and healthy. By engaging our associates in the many facets of this omni-channel campaign and helping them to find dinner solutions, resources and tools that would be useful in their own lives, they became our biggest supporters and brand ambassadors. How did your campaign incorporate health and wellness? NMC: All of the inspiration for our recipes and the in-store activations that took place with our dietitians are based on recipes that meet our criteria, which, as a rule, follows the recommendations of the nutritional criteria of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. During September, our dietitians held food samplings, cooking classes and community events dedicated to Family Meals Month which helped provide a constant source of inspiration and education to customers looking for better-for-you dinner solutions. How will you promote family meals in the future? NMC: Helping customers to enjoy more family meals at home is [...]
Fri, Jun 21, 2019
FMI News
By Kelli Windsor, Director, Digital Communications, Food Marketing Institute Let's go to a place my husband would consider very scary—the inner workings of my mind and how I make a decision about when, where and how I shop for grocery items for my family. I'm suggesting we take this journey together because of an interesting finding in the 2019 U.S. Grocery Shopper Trends report—the beginning of a plateau in the reach of online grocery shopping in part due to a flat-trend from Millennials. A Look at the Plateau According to Trends, 33% of grocery shoppers have used an online-only retailer for their shopping needs at least occasionally.  The reach of online retail has expanded among Gen X with 40% utilizing these options in 2019 vs. 29% in 2018. Meanwhile Millennials' online grocery shopping habits have remained level—43% utilizing them in 2017 and 2018 and 45% utilizing them in 2019. However, Millennials have a higher frequency of using online grocery shopping than any other age group. So, the growth for the online channel seems likely to come from enhanced frequency instead of greater reach. Breaking it down further by looking at the Trends data tables, Millennials with kids verses Millennials without kids display similar habits: Frequency of Shopping Online-Only/Online-Primarily Retailers for Millennials with and without Kids   Millennials With Kids Millennials Without Kids At least Occasionally 50% 42% [...]
Thu, Jun 20, 2019
FMI News
By: Hannah Walker, Senior Director, Technology and Nutrition Policy, Food Marketing Institute In the wonky world of financial services and banking, we use acronyms almost as often as the DOD (Department of Defense, of course!). Whether we are talking about APR, ACH, CNP* or RTGS to the typical person on the street…we may sound just a little crazy. I often find myself chatting with industry colleagues about how crucial it is for the Federal Reserve Bank (FED) to act on Real Time Gross Settlement (RTGS), or as I like to put it, “time's a-wastin'.” All too frequently, I get glassy-eyed stares, half-smiles, and then the inevitable “what are RTGS?” in response. So, what is RTGS? It is a commonsense solution that the Federal Reserve Bank (FED) can implement to bring U.S. payments into the 21st century, in order to mirror what is happening in the global market. Instead of waiting days for a card transaction to settle, it would happen in real-time. Why is RTGS so important? From the retailer perspective, it would spur innovation, create certainty in payments, and free-up the billions of dollars in capital that's fettered in transit while we wait days for a transaction to settle. For the consumers? RTGS' promote real-time transparency into their actual credit charges, and eliminates the days of “pending” transactions that become added to their total card balances.   Why is FMI and so many others clamoring for the FED to move forward with its proposal to stand up a RTGS system here in the United States?   Last year, the Federal Reserve issued a request for comment on a proposal to establish a real time gross settlement system here in the United States. FMI enthusiastically submitted comments strongly supporting the FED moving forward with the proposal. We know a few, but loud voices in the payments system have raised objections to the proposal with the idea that this can and is being done in the private market.   This argument falls flat with retailers, consumers and just about everyone else in the payment's ecosystem. The fact is, the U.S. is far behind the rest of the world in both innovation and speed in settlement. The FED has the reach needed to incorporate every financial institution, not just a select few into a nationwide RTGS system. By standing up a RTGS system that every financial institution in the U.S. has access to, the FED will actually spur competition and innovation in the payments space. So, as I've said before, “time's a-wastin'.” The FED needs to move forward with RTGS here in the U.S. You can view our comments on RTGS here.   *Annual percentage rate (APR), Automated Clearing House (ACH), Card Not Present (CNP) [...]
Wed, Jun 19, 2019
FMI News
By: Adam Friedlander, Specialist, Food Safety and Technical Services, Food Marketing Institute Earlier this month, the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) held their annual convention in New Orleans, Louisiana to promote advances in food science with approximately 20,000 conference attendees. Whether I roamed the expo floor or attended technical sessions, I learned that FMI members have an opportunity to increase their leadership presence by joining this passionate community.  Here are a few key highlights from my week at IFT19: Emerging Trends Plant-based proteins, CBD, low-calorie sweeteners and newly developed flavors dominated the expo floor. Discussions about data collection and data utilization served as a common theme in technical sessions and keynote addresses. Networking with Food Science Students and Professors To raise food safety leadership, FMI members are encouraged to network with IFT Student Association (IFTSA) peers to learn how their technical expertise can advance food safety and nutrition goals throughout the world. By walking around the expo floor, I was able to meet students and administrators of top food science programs and share information about the FMI Foundation Food Safety and Auditing Scholarship – applications for the 2019/2020 year will be accepted until September 13, 2019.  Global Food Traceability Center For the first time in IFT history, the Global Food Traceability Center (GFTC) held scientific presentations directly in the middle of the expo floor. These sessions were important for regulators, retailers, product suppliers, academics and data analysts to gain greater exposure to the promises and limitations for traceability technologies.  Introduction to Product Suppliers and Private Brands  On the expo floor, I met bulk ingredient manufacturers, flavor suppliers and private brand processors to learn more about their food safety practices and how they work with retailers to ensure safe, quality products.  Overall, I learned that FMI has a tremendous opportunity to build a greater leadership presence in the agricultural industry by becoming active participants in the IFT community. Building inclusive, diverse and passionate networks of food science experts are crucial for retailers, wholesalers and product suppliers to advance food safety initiatives, together. FMI proudly supports IFT and we encourage our members to learn more about opportunities within the IFT community.    For more information on how the FMI Food and Product Safety Team works with all supply chain partners to help keep food safe, please visit https://www.fmi.org/food-safety/food-safety-news.  [...]
Tue, Jun 18, 2019
FMI News
By: Carol Abel, Vice President of Education Program Development, Food Marketing Institute It may seem our 2020 FMI Midwinter Executive Conference is far away, but it'll be upon us before we know it. At FMI, we continue to address the industry's most pressing issues and the Midwinter Conference allows us to convene, collaborate and innovate. We received some incredible feedback from our recent event – our most well-attended yet! In response to this wonderful feedback, we've made a few adjustments to the schedule to make the best use of time, amplify executive networking and consolidate education content. In 2020, we'll have expanded networking and meal activities such as: Friday Meat & CatchUp Picnic; Saturday Soup, Sandwich and Speakers session; Fireside Chats: Increased, informal small group discussions; More FMItech Talks and Exchanges; More time for the Strategic Executive Exchange on Monday; and Independent operators will benefit from an extended meeting and store tours. Further schedule updates include: Saturday keynote reduced to 1-hour; FMI Annual Meeting on Sunday morning; Golf and Stir It Up! remains on Sunday; and Executive Leadership Award celebration at the Board of Directors lunch.  Visit FMI.org/Midwinter to learn more.   [...]
Mon, Jun 17, 2019
FMI News
Recently, FMI's Lucas Darnell, director, member relations and advocacy (Eastern Region), visited with David Wilke of Wilke's Grocery Store in Elkader, Iowa. Wilke's is the fifth oldest grocery store operating in the United states, and recently celebrated 150 years of being in business. [...]
Fri, Jun 14, 2019
FMI News
By Hilary Thesmar, PhD, RD, CFS, Chief Food and Product Safety Officer and Senior Vice President Food Safety, Food Marketing Institute Romaine lettuce might bring several images to mind. It might remind you of a delicious Caesar Salad, it might remind you of a beautiful display of food on the family table, or it might remind you of having to pull the product twice from your supply chain and your stores without warning in April and again in November of 2018. The question we heard repeatedly was, “How can I protect myself from having to go through that again?” Some things are out of our control, but as a big believer to control what we can, the food and product safety team along with the FMI Food Protection Committee have put together a plan and Recommended Food Safety Practices for Leafy Greens to help you work with your suppliers and know what to ask for when you are purchasing leafy greens.  Earlier this year, the FMI Board of Directors provided us with direction to help prevent contamination of leafy greens; to increase communication across the entire supply chain; to protect consumers and the safety of products; and to effectively respond to food safety incidents, should they occur again. The FMI Food Protection Committee went through a process of identifying the most important issues, determining retail/wholesale industry actions that could have the desired impact on each issue and the likelihood of success of those actions. The plan included evaluating food safety standards and making recommendations to the retail and wholesale industry.  We've been working with the FMI Food Protection Committee enacting this plan. It's involved trips to leafy green production areas in Arizona and California, discussions with local and federal government officials, food safety professionals and produce experts, and evaluating the process and breaking down the supply chain step-by-step. The result of our investigation is a new tool for food retailers and wholesalers, Recommended Food Safety Practices for Leafy Greens. This eight-page document aims to: Prevent contamination of leafy greens. Increase communication across the entire supply chain. Protect consumers and the safety of products. Effectively respond to food safety incidents, should they occur again. Within the document we outline four key recommendations for food retailers and wholesalers designed to help our members ensure the safety of the products they sell. When it comes to sourcing leafy greens, we outline best practices and recommend robust food safety specifications for food retailer communication with suppliers. The health and safety of our customers are the primary goal of all retailers and wholesalers.  We encourage food retailers and wholesalers of all sizes to consider implementing these recommendations to both raise and consolidate standards for prevention, but also to reduce risk. We hope you will closely evaluate these recommendations and include them in your supplier approval programs.    Download Recommended Food Safety Practices for Leafy Greens [...]
Thu, Jun 13, 2019
FMI News
By: Ashley Eisenbeiser, Director, Food and Product Safety Programs, Food Marketing Institute Because of the uncertainty of the world we live in, there has been an increase emphasis on food defense to protect the food supply from these intentional acts intended to cause harm. Food and product contamination can occur at any point in the supply chain—from field to table.  In some instances, contamination is unintentional, for example, contamination resulting from poor employee food safety practices. Contamination, however, can be intentional.   FDA's Intentional Adulteration (IA) rule is intended to protect public health by preventing intentional adulteration from acts that are intended to cause wide-scale harm, including acts of terrorism targeting the food supply. Generally, the rule applies to companies who manufacture, process, pack and hold food and are required to be registered food facilities with the FDA, including both domestic and foreign food facilities, are subject to the IA rule.  Although FDA's Intentional Adulteration rule does not apply to retail food establishments, as the last link in the supply chain before food reaches  consumers, it is just as important for retailers to take the necessary actions to protect the food products they sell and reduce the risk of intentional harm.  Food defense has long been a priority for retailers. Grocers have established food defense plans to actively prevent intentional contamination in the food supply chain. It is as important as ever for retailers to remain on alert and proactively looking for signs of tampering or intentional contamination or any othersuspicious activity that could put customers at risk.  FMI has put together a resource document, Food Defense Guideline, as part of FMI's Crisis Continuity Toolkit, to supplement many of the existing food defense resources and provide information to assist key personnel to prepare, respond, stabilize, and recover from a tampering or intentional contamination event.  Resources to help ensure your company is prepared for a crisis before one occurs: Attend 2019 NRF Protect, June 11-13 in Anaheim, CA FMI Food Defense Guideline SQFI Food Defense Tip Sheet Mitigation Strategies Database FDA Food Defense Plan Builder [...]
Wed, Jun 12, 2019
FMI News
By: Peter Matz, Director, Nutrition & Food Policy, Food Marketing Institute Whether you are walking through the aisles of your local supermarket, convenience store, pharmacy or simply perusing a health magazine, you have probably seen an increase in the number of products and advertisements promoting ingredients such as hemp and especially cannabidiols or “CBD.” Given the significant consumer interest in this emerging market, more and more companies are taking steps towards entering this space; from ingestible products, including foods, beverages and dietary supplements, to topical products, such as cosmetics, creams and lotions – for both human and animal use. For starters, it's important we get the terminology straight. What is the relationship between between marijuana, hemp and cannabis? What about THC and CBD?   “Marijuana” and “hemp” are both common names for the plant Cannabis sativa L, which refers to the plantgenus and species.  Marijuana generally refers to the variety of the plant with characteristics that maximize the content of certain chemical compounds.  On the other hand, hemp generally refers to varieties grown to maximize fiber content that can be used in textiles, rope, paper, consumer products, and construction materials. The distinction between marijuana and hemp is based on the THC concentration of the plant. “Hemp” refers to any part of the cannabis plant with a THC concentration of .3% or less. Cannabis contains a wide variety of chemical compounds including cannabinoids.  Two well-known cannabinoids are Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and CBD.  THC has psychoactive effects in the human body, while hemp-derived CBD does not. Although scientific research on its medicinal qualities in humans is still in its infancy and far more data is needed, CBD products are frequently marketed to help with a host of medical conditions – everything from anxiety and sleeplessness, to depression and inflammation. Why is this a regulatory challenge for the food retail industry?  The 2018 Farm Bill, which was signed into law earlier this year, has caused mass confusion within the marketplace regarding hemp and CBD products.  Although the Farm Bill contains several provisions that allow for the production and commercialization of hemp and hemp-derivatives like CBD, the new law explicitly preserves FDA's authority over the use of such ingredients in FDA-regulated products.  Furthermore, FDA's current position is that CBD cannot be legally marketed as an ingredient in food, beverages or dietary supplements.  And while FDA enforcement to date has been limited to targeting manufacturers of CBD-containing products promoting the most egregious of health claims, such as their products' ability to prevent cancer, the agency has no official enforcement discretion policy and could still take action against other stakeholers.  This complex regulatory landscape and lack of guidance from FDA has created significant confusion for the public, suppliers and retailers, and state regulators. What is FMI doing about it? Above all else, FMI is appealing to both the federal government and Congress for additional clarity on the regulatory framework for products containing CBD and other hemp-derivatives. Most recently, on May 31, FMI presented to FDA during the Agency's daylong public hearing on this topic, using the opportunity to convey the seriousness of the regulatory [...]
Tue, Jun 11, 2019
FMI News
By: Leslie Sarasin, President and CEO, Food Marketing Institute Frank Yiannis, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) deputy commissioner of food policy and response, gave FMI's and GMA's joint initiative urging industry-wide adoption of standard date-label language a ringing endorsement in his recent letter to the industry, stating the agency's strong support of food company's voluntary efforts. The collaborative work on this issue seeks to reduce consumer confusion surrounding the assorted vernacular used in reference to date labels by encouraging the industry-wide adoption of standard date label language. Now both USDA and FDA have endorsed “BEST If Used By” as the preferred date label language to be used on the majority of grocery store products where the intended consumer guidance is in reference to product quality.  Yiannis' letter makes the point that some 20% of consumer food waste can be attributed to our customers' misunderstanding of date labels and premature discard of viable food. Our hope is that clarifying the date-label language will result in improved shopper understanding that the “BEST If Used By” guidance refers to quality and the product is safe to eat beyond its date but may not offer optimum taste. Clarification of the messaging associated with the date imprint and assistance to the consumer in better interpreting date labels should help prevent the unnecessary discarding of products that  are still perfectly appropriate for consumption, but have simply passed their period of peak performance.   It should be noted that our date label initiative also recommended adoption of standard language “USE by” for those few grocery items susceptible to material degradation to the extent it is unwise to consume them beyond the date stamp. FDA indicated the agency wants additional time to examine this demarcation as it carries more significant implications and is a more difficult one to determine. Work on this project began in 2017 under the purview of the Trading Partner Alliance, a retailer-manufacturer collaboration body comprised of Board member executives from FMI and GMA. A special  word of thanks goes out to Joe Colalillo of ShopRite of Hunterdon County, Inc. for his leadership as retail co-chair of the TPA Product Code Dating Committee. In a note I wrote to Frank Yiannis to thank him for his supportive words and leadership in the date label area, which pre-dates his work at FDA, I expressed FMI's intent to keep him apprised of our efforts to educate consumers and increase adoption of the standardized date labels. We also expressed our desire to coordinate consumer-facing educational efforts with FDA to maximize efficiency and effectiveness. Below, please find links to FMI resources, our press release and FDA's letter to the industry regarding the product code date labeling initiative.  FMI press statement regarding the FDA Support of the Product Code Date Labeling Initiative FMI resources regarding the Product Code Date Labeling FDA Letter to the Food Industry [...]
Mon, Jun 10, 2019
FMI News
By: Dagmar Farr, Chief Member Relations Officer and Senior Vice President, Membership and Education, Food Marketing Institute Nearly 400 attendees joined Future Leaders eXperience last month to bridge the gap between their company's present and future success with new leadership development. It's no surprise that food retail's organizational chart of the future will look different than it does today. The exciting part of this change is hearing the many visions of how this structural chart will evolve. Jim Frusciante, head of U.S. sales at Kraft Heinz and co-chair of Future Leaders eXperience, shared his outlook on leadership, talent, and what it takes to succeed in food retail.   What does leadership mean in our business? Frusciante: “This new hierarchy of leadership requires adaptability and a willingness to always continue to learn and improve. Future leaders need to “fail fast” and adjust, make smart decisions quickly, maintain a constant focus on leveraging digital and bridging its benefits to retail, be comfortable with thinner margins, and never, ever lose focus on providing the best service for customers.” How can we handle change effectively, especially with our talent? Frusciante: “With the constant change and innovation we experience in our industry daily, the future organizational structure is hard to predict. However, there are foundational elements that will heavily influence future talent and structures in our industry, including an unwavering connection to current consumer preferences, a solid educational background, a balance of experience and entrepreneurship, a data-driven mindset, and a nimble approach.” “For recruitment and retention specifically, I firmly believe that when it comes to recruiting the best people for our business, we need to be where the best talent is – both physically and digitally. Face-to-face interaction remains critical, but leveraging social and digital media for talent attraction helps us more effectively reach a diverse talent base.” Why is diversity important to our overall success? Frusciante: “I have had the privilege of working with people that are different from me in a lot of ways, and recognizing, understanding, and appreciating those differences has been integral to how I lead the U.S. Sales team at Kraft Heinz. Talent diversity is multi-faceted, and I believe we are better and stronger by building a team that is diverse in thought, gender, ethnicity, race, backgrounds, ideas, and more. I also believe in the power of good people skills, so I pay special attention to individuals who have warm and welcoming personalities, but also are competitive and think quickly on their feet. As an industry, I don't know if we're truly there yet, but I hope that we're all consciously making strides to be more diverse and inclusive so that we can be more capable and reflective of our increasingly diverse consumer base.” For more information on Future Leaders eXperience, visit FMI.org/FutureLeaders [...]
Thu, Jun 06, 2019
FMI News
By: Sarah Malenich, Director, Marketing & Sales, Safe Quality Food Institute, and Ashley Eisenbeiser, Director, Food and Product Safety Programs, Food Marketing Institute  With World Food Safety Day on June 7, 2019, quickly approaching, we're reminded that in a world where the food supply chain has become more complex, any adverse food safety incident may have global negative effects on public health, trade and the economy.  FMI and SQFI support World Food Safety Day because it promotes awareness of the importance of food safety and inspires actions for safer food.  With the passing of the Food Safety Modernization Act, progressing technology, and more people developing food allergies, staying informed and trained on the latest trends and studies is essential in the food safety industry.  When management is committed to creating a food safety culture, recalls and market withdraws are reduced, efficiencies are increased, and costs are lowered. As food safety professionals, we can take advantage of training and conferences/industry meetings that provide solutions to food safety problems.  SQF offers many in-person and online training options for their stakeholders, and the SQF Conference is an excellent event to collaborate and receive practical solutions to food safety and quality questions. To keep food safe, we need a well-trained workforce. A critical issue for accredited third-party auditing in North America is sourcing the next generation of well-trained auditors. As a way to help fill that gap, the FMI Foundation sponsors scholarships for students currently enrolled in food and agricultural science majors at a North American accredited university/college. The scholarship includes a $3,000 scholarship award, an all-expenses paid trip to the SQF Conference, along with global recognition from FMI and SQFI. The FMI Foundation provides further support for food safety initiatives as a founding partner of the Partnership for Food Safety Education (PFSE).  PFSE develops and promotes consumer food safety education programs to ensure food safety continues once food leaves the grocery store and is in the hands of the consumer. PFSE offers a variety of food safety resources, including the newly released Safe Recipe Style Guide.This guide provides specific, concise recipe text to address the four major areas of most food safety violations in home kitchens: temperature, handwashing, cross contamination and produce handling. The guide was inspired by a study in the Journal of Food Protection that shows significant improvement in food safety behavior in home kitchens when recipes contain food safety instructions written into the text. We encourage you to participate in World Food Safety Day raise awareness around food safety at all levels and around the world by joining the conversation #WorldFoodSafetyDay and following food safety guidelines every day. For more information and resources about World Food Safety Day, visit www.foodsafetyday.org.  [...]
Wed, Jun 05, 2019
FMI News
By: David Fikes, Vice President, Communications and Consumer/Community Affairs, Food Marketing Institute As cornerstones in their communities throughout America, grocers host food drives, after-school programs, health and well-being initiatives, and other charitable events - all in the spirit of improving their special corner of the world.   The Food Marketing Institute recognizes food retailers as the driving force behind neighborhood support and charitable events through its Community Outreach Awards. These have become one of the most anticipated and fun recognitions at FMI. Traditionally in the fall, food retailers submit their best practice examples of programs designed to educate and mentor youth; impact the overall health or engagement of a community; or bring a meal to those in underserved areas.    Even though fall brings a change of season, it often feels like we're performing a delicate balancing act between multiple events, including back to school madness. To help relieve a bit of the high demand for consumer outreach and programming that food retailers find themselves navigating during this time, FMI is moving its Community Outreach Awards program to be celebrated during the summer months. Community programs running from October 1, 2018 – June 1, 2019 will be considered for the 2019 Community Outreach Awards. Share your submissions with us from June 10 – June 21.  Be on the lookout for this earlier-than-usual opportunity to tout the good you do in your neighborhood. To inspire your 2019 nominations, here are a few examples from the 2017 Community Outreach Award Winners: Albertsons Companies: Eating Healthy With Diabetes Eating Healthy With Diabetes is a grocery store tour offered at no cost and led by a locally registered dietitian and an in-store pharmacist. The program is on-track to conduct over 300 tours, with an average tour size of 8-10 individuals. Many Albertsons dietitians partnered with government programs and community groups on the tours. Hy-Vee: Food and Beverage Distribution in Wake of 2018 Tornadoes In response to major tornado damage across several Iowa communities on July 19, 2018, Hy-Vee donated meals, snacks and beverages to impacted residents and emergency workers. From Hy-Vee's efforts, more than 20,000 individuals benefitted from food assistance and Hy-Vee distributed 111,000 bottles of water across various communities. The total value of donations provided by Hy-Vee equated to approximately $200,000. Greer's: Apples for the Students Apples for the Students provides educational supplies (from pencils to printers) to schools at no cost to them. Since its inception by Greer's, 52 schools that have received free educational equipment. Greer's donated $60,500 towards school supplies/equipment in 2018 alone.  BriarPatch Food Co-op: Hospitality House Culinary Program Hospitality House is a community effort to help homeless Nevada County residents get back on their feet. BriarPatch Food Co-Op offered to fund their culinary job-training dinners by providing farm-fresh ingredients for meals that culinary students create for shelter guests. Students make dinner for the 54 men, women and children staying at the shelter, and they learn to consider costs while planning a balanced, nutritious meal. For more information, please visit FMI.org/CommunityOutreach.   [...]
Tue, Jun 04, 2019
FMI News